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Originally established for times when I needed more than 140 characters to finish a thought on marketing or media.


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No Facebook: Week 3

Did I log off Facebook too soon?

I was asking myself that last week when Facebook’s most recent redesign sparked an outcry among users. I wanted to see what the fuss was about. I’ve missed the “huge” changes, all the rage, all my friends’ comments about how they feel about it. I got an eyeful of brief opinions on Twitter, but not enough to overdose. (I can log off Twitter more easily than I could Facebook.) Now folks are saying they’ll quit Facebook, but social media watchers are saying no, they won’t.

But I had already quit Facebook. Was it time to go back?

No.

Although I want to see how the brand pages might look and how marketers would respond to the changes, I’m enjoying my time from Facebook. Right after I logged off, I noticed my life seemed quieter; it was something I couldn’t explain. Then my friend Terry pointed out that social media carries an obligation: If we’re logged on, we are expected required to respond. On Facebook, I felt I was required to respond to everything, no matter how large or small. After I quit Facebook, I felt like something had been deleted from my daily to-do list. I realized what I was feeling was relief.

That’s not to say there aren’t some things I miss about being on Facebook: I miss keeping up with my niece who just started high school. I miss keeping up with my best friend from college. I miss seeing what people are saying about Allstate’s Mayhem commercials.

But I don’t miss spending 16% of my online time looking at strangers’ Lady Gaga photos. And after reading about the creepy Timeline and auto-sharing features, I miss Facebook even less.

I still can’t say whether I’ll stay gone from Facebook forever. Deactivating my account was an experiment to eliminate some distractions. I told my friends I would be gone just for a little while, and then I set an end date for Nov. 1. But I’m not sure I’ll log on after that. I’m finding that there is life outside of Facebook, and I like it.
 

EARLIER: How Lady Gaga helped me get off Facebook

 

YOU NEED TO KNOW: Mashable on Facebook’s auto-sharing feature

 


In case you haven’t heard: Google+ wants you — now

As of last night, the Google Doodle is a bold blue arrow inviting the masses to join Google+, the social network that was introduced in late June as a “field trial” that aimed to fix “awkward” online sharing. Users could join the project by invitation only, which made building one’s circles kind of dull. I was eager to be on the bleeding edge of this newest thing, and a well-connected friend scored me an invitation; however, it wasn’t until later that I could send my own. When I did, some of my friends hadn’t heard of Google+, and some of them had and didn’t care. Even so, in less than a month of the launch, Google+ was estimated to have 20 million users, according to web-traffic tracker ComScore. About that same time, Facebook confirmed estimates that it boasts 750 million users.

If you’re tired of Facebook or just intrigued by the ideas of the Circles and Hangouts — or if you just need one more site to log into — sign up for Google+ today. You’re good enough, smart enough, and doggone it, Google likes you. (Just be sure to use your real name. See post below.)

What is this? Why can’t I just know you on Facebook?

~Real response to a Google+ invitation

 

EARLIER:

Google+ (NASDAQ: GOOG) has revised its profile policy and is suspending accounts with pseudonyms. Saurabh Sharma explains the change in a one-minute video.
 

 


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FLASHBACK: JUST IN: Toyota Venza girl does an ad for eBay

UPDATE 8-12-12: Allyn Rachel, aka the Toyota Venza girl, is angry about Triscuits.

 

UPDATE 11-03-2011: Like the ad? Show Allyn Rachel the love on her Facebook page.

 
Toyota Venza Interactive Ad on YahooED’S NOTE: This post reflects my interest in advertising as a marketing student. The opinions expressed here are mine and in no way reflect the opinions of my employers.
 

* * * * * * * *

UPDATED with details 9-20-2011

Googlers have been hitting this site to see whether the “Toyota Venza girl” is also featured in the recent eBay commercial entitled “Blue Jeans.”

She is — as you can see here. I don’t have any information about this clip right now, but I’ll see what I can dig up. She plays Susie, the daughter with the super hip mobile device iPad.

(Post continues after video.)
 

 

This commercial is part of eBay’s “When it’s on your mind, it’s on eBay” campaign designed to expand the ecommerce giant’s footprint in mobile commerce, a daunting task for a company seen primarily as an auction marketplace. With the “Buy It New, Buy It Now” call to action, eBay urges shoppers to take advantage of the 62% of 200 million live listings that are “fixed price,” and the 70% of those products that are new. (Like the new jeans that actress Allyn Rachel orders in the commercial.)

According to the press release announcing the campaign, eBay is targeting the “shopping enthusiasts,” the category of shopper who are most likely to shop using mobile devices. The first step in reaching those shoppers is through legacy media: Six 30-second TV commercials began airing Sept. 14 on national cable network shows including Top Gear, SportsCenter, Tosh.0, The Daily Show with Jon Stewart, Top Chef and The Rachel Zoe Project — about the time Googlers started hitting this site looking for more information about the actress and the “Blue Jeans” ad.

At the time of this update writing, this YouTube video (posted Sept. 17) had 1,271 379 views, 3 1 likes and 0 dislikes.

AGENCY: Venables Bell & Partners, the folks who convinced us that Slim Jims are “mantastic!”

* * * * * * * *

See more of Allyn Rachel’s work on YouTube, Twitter, this blog and other Web 2.0 outlets.
 

UPDATE 10-27-2011: Ally Rachel on Twitter

 

EARLIER:Toyota Venza Girl on MSN

 

EARLIER: Toyota Venza Girl on Yahoo!

 

EARLIER: More on the girl in Toyota Venza commercial

 

EVEN EARLIER: Toyota Venza: ‘That’s not a real puppy’

 

RELATED: How Lady Gaga helped me get off Facebook

 


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Toyota Venza girl spotted on MSN!

UPDATE 11-03-2011: Like the ad?
 
Show Allyn Rachel the love on her Facebook page.

 

* * * * * * * *

ED’S NOTE: The commentary here reflects my interest in advertising as a marketing student. No agencies or products are endorsed. The opinions expressed here are mine and in no way reflect the opinions of my employers.

Our heroine from the Toyota Venza commercial has been recently spotted on the MSN portal in an interactive ad that encourages viewers to “learn stuff.” It seems as though this is the same ad that appeared on Yahoo! in July, complete with the appealing character who engages with the viewer — “Click on something!” — and unassuming links: “Learn more at Toyota.com” and, of course, “See the commercial on YouTube.”

Like this commercial? Hate it?

 

Tell me why! (No registration required.)

 
There are a lot of clips of the popular TV commercial on YouTube, so it’s difficult to get an accurate number of views. At the time of this writing, this YouTube video (posted July 6) had 102,278 views, 427 likes and 31 dislikes. On the official Toyota channel, with lovely Venza display ad (natch!), the video had 26,289 8,129 views, including 75 likes and 11 dislikes.

A quick scroll through the comments leads me to believe even less in America’s education system, and so I will not be posting quotes from “the conversation.”

Although the official Toyota channel’s numbers aren’t that impressive, collectively the video posts have sparked quite a bit of consumer engagement – which is what a marketer wants when investing in Internet advertising. And while the viewing audience was introduced to the Venza girl (played by Allyn Rachel) through old-fashioned television advertising, we’re getting to know her better here on the innerwebs thanks to YouTube, Twitter, this blog and other Web 2.0 outlets.
 

 
About the Toyota YouTube Channel
(As of Sept. 18, 2011)

  • Channel Views: 4,769,316
  • Total Upload Views: 14,826,660
  • Joined: March 5, 2008
  • Subscribers: 10,485

 

UPDATE 9-18-2011: Toyota Venza Girl plugs eBay

 

EARLIER: Toyota Venza Girl on Yahoo!

 

EARLIER: More on the girl in Toyota Venza commercial

 

EVEN EARLIER: Toyota Venza: ‘That’s not a real puppy’

 

RELATED: How Lady Gaga helped me get off Facebook

 


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How Lady Gaga helped me get off Facebook

ED’S NOTE: Amended Sept. 13, 2011, for clarity.

I have done the unthinkable: I have deactivated my Facebook account. That was three days ago, three years to the day that I joined Facebook.

I had joined Facebook in 2008 as my personal 9/11 Project. Each year I do something to change my life for the better. Sometimes it’s big; sometimes it’s small. It’s my way of reclaiming my autumns. I started this several years ago when I realized that if I didn’t do something – anything – that perfect September days would forever be tarnished by the terrorist attacks of 2001. It isn’t that I want to forget that day; I just want to go forward – with hope. In 2008, I wanted to reconnect with people I had lost touch with. And I did. I made it a project, and Facebook helped. These people mattered to me; I wanted, I needed, to know them again. Now I do, thanks to Facebook.

But with the good came the bad, the ugly and the mundane. Several times, I found myself overdosing on information that I didn’t need, and so I’d uninstall the app from my BlackBerry and later, my iPhone. Then I would re-install it less than 8 12 hours later.

My friends need to know about my vacation, commute, dinner, dammit!

A recent Monday night, I found myself logged on well after 1 a.m., clicking through photos of a Lady Gaga concert posted by a sister-of-a-friend-of-a-friend.

We were at that concert! She lives three states away! She was at the same concert! Miracle!

No, not miracle. Insanity. I didn’t know this woman. I will never meet this woman. I can’t tell you how I found her album or why I felt compelled to click through it. I can only tell you that I lost 20 minutes of my life trying to determine whether she and I were at the same show in 2010.

She had better seats than we did, didn’t she?

Who gives a shit?

Evidently, I do.

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What’s in a name? Google+ users say everything

Google+ (NASDAQ: GOOG) has revised its profile policy and is suspending accounts with pseudonyms. Saurabh Sharma explains the change in a one-minute video.
 

 
Dave Copeland at the Daily Dot has a post on users’ response to the change.

And now I have to log off and revise the post I’ve been writing about Google+’s privacy policy.


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And even more on the Toyota Venza girl!

ED’S NOTE: The commentary here reflects my interest in advertising as a marketing student. The opinions expressed here are mine and in no way reflect the opinions of my employers.

Toyota Venza Interactive Ad on YahooToyota Venza ad on Yahoo

Our heroine from the Toyota Venza commercial has been recently spotted on the Yahoo! portal in an interactive ad that encourages viewers to “learn stuff.” An ad is just an ad, some might argue, but this interactive ad is engaging the viewer with its appealing character (“Click on something.”) and unassuming links: “See the commercial on YouTube” and “Learn more at Toyota.com.”

So what’s the big deal? At the time of this writing, this YouTube video (posted July 6) had 55,198 views, 300 likes and 23 dislikes. On the official Toyota channel, with lovely Venza display ad (natch!), the video had 8,129 views, including 55 likes and five dislikes.

Although the official Toyota channel’s numbers aren’t that impressive, collectively the video posts have sparked quite a bit of consumer engagement – which is what a marketer wants when investing in Internet advertising. And although the viewing audience was introduced to the Venza girl (played by Allyn Rachel) through old-fashioned television advertising, we’re getting to know her better here on the innerwebs thanks to YouTube, Twitter, this blog and other Web 2.0 outlets.
 

 

EARLIER: Toyota Venza: ‘That’s not a real puppy’

 

RELATED: More on the girl in Toyota Venza commercial