J's Page

For when I need more than 140 characters to finish a thought on marketing, media or message.


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Briefly on ‘Zero Dark Thirty’

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Thanks, GetGlue!

I finally got to see Zero Dark Thirty this weekend. It was a long time coming; I thought more screens in the D.C. area would have had it sooner than the nationwide release. When it finally did arrive, the shows were sold out. Until I could see it, I read about the real-life CIA operative the film is based on. The news stories were just as juicy as the script.

Without giving away any plot points — even though we all know how it ends — here are a couple of thoughts on my second-most-anticipated film of the year.

  • The suspect they were questioning in the first act looked a lot like Paul Rudd. It was distracting. (“No one should waterboard Paul Rudd! He’s too cute!”)
  • Jessica Chastain was very good, but she wasn’t transformed. Meryl Streep she’s not.
  • NOBODY’S hair could look that good in the desert. Ever.

Me on Get Glue: The one movie I’ve waited for all year

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… I think we can all agree we’ve all moved on since Gigli. We’re checking into Argo with 880 viewers on opening night — not because of Affleck’s awesome wig but because it was history, baby.


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Add to your Netflix queue: ‘Tabloid’

Make sure you catch Errol Morris’ fascinating documentary about a former beauty queen charged with abducting, imprisoning and raping a young Mormon missionary in the 1970s. Nearly 40 years after Joyce McKinney made tabloid headlines in the U.K., she still says the young Mormon was the love of her life.

 


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Marketing tools for good

ED’S NOTE: This post reflects my interest in advertising as a marketing student. It does not endorse any product, services, organizations, campaigns or agency. The opinions expressed here are mine and in no way reflect the opinions of my employers.

The Demi and Ashton Foundation’s new “Real Men” interactive campaign begins this week, using A-listers such as Justin Timberlake to educate the public about the child sex trade in the USA.

Certainly it’s a cause more worthy than, say, aiding a Kardashian or a Real Housewife — the foundation’s efforts to raise awareness aren’t without merit. But doesn’t there seem to be a huge disconnect here between the very serious subject of child sex slavery and the flippant tone of the ad’s script?


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Kenny Powers is f-in’ IN March Madness

Tournageddon: Experience March Madness the Kenny Powers wayED’S NOTEThis post reflects my interest in advertising as a marketing student. It does not endorse any product, services or agency. The opinions expressed here are mine and in no way reflect the opinions of my employers.

Kenny Powers is back hawking K-Swiss Tubes during the sweat-soaked, beer-stained, testosterone-fueled insanity that is March Madness.

Yes, this news is about as fresh as a towel on a locker room floor  — I have to admit that I had forgotten about our loveable anti-hero and his side job for K-Swiss (NASDAQ: KSWS). Even so, I want to quickly examine  the most recent leg of the campaign I wrote about last summer. “Tournageddon” is a balls-to-the-wall social-media push that starts on Facebook and ends up on Yahoo Fantasy Sports.

Fans can submit their picks, pore over team analyses, get recaps filled with Kenny’s insights and — ultimately — they can spend more times him and his Tubes. And when fans are done killing time mourning their busted brackets, they can download the Muscle Machine app from iTunes or let Kenny manage their Facebook page with the Workout Wingman app. The idea behind the Wingman app is you’ll be “training in K-SWISS Tubes like a true frickin’ champion” instead of Facebooking (fat chance) and Kenny will answer your friends’ posts (“You’re f-in’ OUT, MOM!”).

Since I last wrote about Kenny Powers and Tubes, the Tubes site has been overhauled with a very masculine red and black theme. Very fiery. Powerful. Like Hell. Makes me want to go buy some Axe body wash or something. Lame jokes aside, it’s a very comprehensive e-commerce portal: Shoppers can customize a pair of Tubes, watch the very funny advertising spots featuring Patrick Willis and Jeremy Shockey, connect with Kenny on Facebook and Yahoo, and even order season one of Eastbound & Down, the critically acclaimed six episodes that introduced us to a foul-mouthed has-been ballplayer that somehow stole our hearts.

I think what I appreciate most about the Tubes campaign is how all the copy maintains Kenny’s voice, such as it is outside of the HBO series, while promoting the athletic shoes. It’s unlikely actor/Kenny creator Danny McBride was available to whip up copy for 72andSunny, the agency behind the Tubes campaign, so props to the writers for keeping Kenny real and an appropriate PG-13. He’s still a crass buffoon, even when he’s not dropping the f-bomb after every third utterance.

Finally, here’s Kenny in the spot “Gravity,” featuring New Orleans tight end Jeremy Shockey. I had planned to post this a long time ago, but I couldn’t find it and then I eventually lost interest. Perhaps the lackluster second season of Eastbound & Down played a role in my forgetfulness.

 

 


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At the movies with @foursquare

foursquare at the movies!

This cool foursquare graphic looks at 2010’s opening-weekend movie check-ins, breaking down the data by title, gender preferences and overlap, and regional interest. Of note: Mississippians dug Gulliver’s Travels and Toy Story 3, while Utahns preferred Edge of Darkness and Tooth Fairy.

Among my opening-weekend check-ins: The Town and Wall Street: Money Never Sleeps.  I slept like a baby during both. Not among my opening-weekend check-ins: Sex and the City: 2. I write this proudly.

In other foursquare news, the location-based social network is now distinguishing between friends and followers. This will allow marketers to determine the users with a large reach. The HubSpot blog has details in their Feb. 28 post that I missed because I was researching strategies for Angry Birds or doing something equally important.

I also missed foursquare’s “Rudest Cities in the World” list posted Feb. 28 on the network’s engineering blog. While it is interesting to know that Manchester, England, has the most … colorful … check-ins in the world, the post more importantly details how the company will mine (explore) the data it collects to make decisions about venues, promotion and demographics. The post is heavy on the tech, but offers some insight into foursquare’s ambitions.

For those more interested in the rude cities themselves, AOL Travel has a roundup.