J's Page

Originally established for times when I needed more than 140 characters to finish a thought on marketing or media.


‘Epilogue – Unfinished’ in Calliope

Contrary to popular belief, I don’t just write about cool ads and personal tech. Sometimes I turn out a piece of poetry or short fiction that gets published. My poem “Epilogue – Unfinished” was published this past spring in the student journal Calliope, which has been released in PDF. There are some excellent student works throughout, including some artwork that will take your breath away.

“Epilogue” was originally a flash-fiction piece that appeared in October 2010 on Paragraph Planet, a creative writing website that features 75-word pieces that are changed daily. It was born from a prompt in class when I overheard a student ask the professor, “Can you give me a first sentence?” (She declined.) I later recast the 75 words as a poem and thought it worked, so I submitted it for consideration. I think it works better as a poem than flash, but I’ll take inspiration any way it hits me.

EARLIER:


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Undisputed luxury

 

Dream DowntownDream DowntownDream Downtown lobby barDream Downtown lobbyDream DowntownDream Downtown

Dream Downtown, a set on Flickr.

Located between Chelsea and the Meat Packing District, this boutique hotel offers unparalleled luxury within walking distance to exquisite dining and a vibrant night scene.

WHERE: Dream Downtown
355 West 16th Street, New York,
NY, United States, 10011
RESERVATIONS: Here.
Traveler’s Advisory: The PH-D Rooftop Lounge and Beach at Dream Downtown are subject to closure for private events. After 9:30pm, entry to PH-D is at the doorman’s discretion; access is not guaranteed. (From the hotel website.)


Train track tags and street graffiti

In ChelseaEarly Friday, I wrapped up an ecommerce class, tried to forget about work and boarded a train for a much-overdue trip to New York City. This meant I had three hours to kill with no WiFi and zero desire to read the book I had brought along. I was, however, armed with my iPhone, so I snapped graffiti as I saw it along the train tracks. (I was on a speeding train, so some photos were better than others.)

As we walked 13 miles around the city on Saturday, I continued to snap away. I took more than 300 photos over two days; in the interest of my readers’ time, I have heavily edited my collection.

On Flickr: Train track tags & street graffiti

 
 

Near public libraryBubble?Grapes?Caress


‘Grease’ was the word we heard: Me on Paragraph Planet

I’m featured on Paragraph Planet today, a 75-word piece was inspired by my friend Amy Stapleford Jackson, who was spending summer afternoons indulging in a revival of the 1978 movie Grease, starring Olivia Newton-John and John Travolta.

For those of us who are a certain age, they were the ones that we wanted. We didn’t want Danny to be stranded at the drive-in, branded a fool. We wanted the beauty school dropout to go back to high school.  Although we were too young to appreciate all the innuendo, we knew all the words by heart and sang each note as if we’d written it, singing into Goody’s hairbrushes and dancing around a bedroom, mentally wearing the skin-tight black pants Sandy wore in the last scene.

Paragraph Planet is a creative writing website that features 75-word flash-fiction pieces on one topic. If you’re a writer, please try your hand at it. There’s something so satisfying about writing just 75 of just-right words. If you’re a reader, click and click daily. There are some real gems there, and they make for a nice breather between phone calls, a shared human moment before another deadline. Writers may also write a sequel to the posted paragraphs using their own 75 words.

Freelance writer Richard Hearn edits the site. He shares is philosophy and vision for the site in an interview with Terry Davidson Byrne at MommyTongue. When he’s not sorting through submissions, Hearn writes the “Distracted Dad” column for Latest Homes and “Dad Sense” for Mumsense magazine. You can follow him on Twitter @latestdad and @paragraphplanet.

After you read my paragraph, read more as you browse the archives or the author pages. Here’s mine, and here’s the page of my friend and former professor, Amanda Holmes.

If inspiration strikes after you’ve lost yourself in story after story, you can submit your 75 words — exactly 75 words — here.