J's Page

For when I need more than 140 characters to finish a thought on marketing, media or message.


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Marketing tools for good

ED’S NOTE: This post reflects my interest in advertising as a marketing student. It does not endorse any product, services, organizations, campaigns or agency. The opinions expressed here are mine and in no way reflect the opinions of my employers.

The Demi and Ashton Foundation’s new “Real Men” interactive campaign begins this week, using A-listers such as Justin Timberlake to educate the public about the child sex trade in the USA.

Certainly it’s a cause more worthy than, say, aiding a Kardashian or a Real Housewife — the foundation’s efforts to raise awareness aren’t without merit. But doesn’t there seem to be a huge disconnect here between the very serious subject of child sex slavery and the flippant tone of the ad’s script?


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Onion investigation: Facebook as CIA’s most valuable tool

Too funny. Too true. Too creepy.

On Twitter:

Four hundred billion tweets and not one piece of useful data was ever transmitted.

On al-Qaeda foursquare threat:

The people who use (foursquare) are people no one would mind seeing bombed anyway.


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Tweet this: D.C. tops ‘Twitter Towns’ list

Does that headline seem familiar? It might. It’s the headline I wrote for today’s story in USA TODAY. (I did not, however, edit the online story.) Didn’t read it? That’s OK. I’ll recap and link: Men’s Health, with the help of Rodale Inc., is reporting that Washington, D.C., is the top socially networked city in the country!

The exclamation point there is just a result of an extra cup of coffee on a rainy day — not actual surprise. It makes sense that the one U.S. city where reach and influence is everything that every person would be wired in Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn and beyond. (“My 140 crappy characters will change this world! I know it!” ~Insert name of unknown congressman here.)

El Paso appears to be the least wired-in city, with research suggesting that residents have a high rate of job satisfaction. The USA TODAY story quotes psychologist and MIT professor Sherry Turkle who says El Paso residents could simply be happier with their off-line lives.

From the story:

“When people are gratified and fulfilled in their face-to-face interactions, when these satisfy their desire for connection, for gossip, for feeling wanted and plugged in, they don’t need to feel technologically plugged in,” Turkle says.

It’s a shame this story couldn’t have been longer because Turkle touches on a question I wrestle with daily: Would I be so plugged in if I were happier and more connected in the physical world? I think that’s something everyone should ask themselves from time to time, especially as digital networks continue to expand and permeate our lives.

Would we be happier without Facebook? Twitter? Digg? Reddit? Etc.?