J's Page

Originally established for times when I needed more than 140 characters to finish a thought on marketing or media.


HBR on re-entry after a career break

Harvard Business Review has an interesting but flawed article on “relaunchers” — people who take a break from their careers and then return to the workforce.

And I have a couple of issues with the piece.Harvard Business Review

No male “relaunchers” were interviewed and the women who were interviewed didn’t explain their career breaks, with the exception of one who noted that she had taken time off to be with her family. First of all, there’s nothing wrong with acknowledging her decision to leave a high-powered job to raise her children. It gives the reader a more insight into her decision to take a career break. Second, noting the reason why she took a break doesn’t diminish her return to the workforce or her subsequent achievements. So why not tell us why the others took their breaks?

As for the omission of a male perspective, the article seems to exclude anyone who took a career break that was unrelated to family. Although I understand that a lot of “relaunchers” are returning after raising a family, surely these programs also have participants who took breaks for other reasons. It would have been good to include those points of view as well.

 

#careers #careerbreaks
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#NOVAMKT: 5 things to know about a Vegas trade show

I just returned from the 2015 NAHB International Builders’ Show and the second annual Design and Construction Week. Wow — what a time. I tagged along with my husband, Trey, the editor of Door and Window Market magazine, and I had hoped to live tweet one of the world’s largest trade shows for marketing students at Northern Virginia Community College; however, I realized that what I learned and what I want to share with MKT students is best served in short blog posts.

The first is a quick overview of what you need to know about a trade show in Vegas:

1. You will get lost every time you leave your room to go to the trade show. Convention centers aren’t a high school gym; they’re huge and often have labyrinthine floor plans. Use the buddy system and go with a co-worker. Use the maps provided by the organizers and route out a plan the night before so you’ll know exactly where you need to go. Allow for extra time between appointments. Everyone will be in your way because they are as lost as you are.

2. You will not have time to party like a rock star. Your day will be jammed packed from 8 a.m. (or earlier!) until 5 p.m. with exhibits, education sessions and networking opportunities. You will be exhausted. Our day started at 6 or 6:15 a.m.

3. Your feet will be killing you by the end of each day. Plan to walk more than you ever have in your working life — and feel like you haven’t really gone anywhere. (Note to those who have waited tables: You’ll probably have no problem with this.) Ladies, your cutest heels were not made for walking this much floor space. Be smart about your shoe choices. Guys, that goes for you, too. We saw attendees of both sexes who looked like they were barely walking by the end of the second day.

4. You will not have the energy to party like a rock star. (See Nos. 2 and 3.)

5. Take enough business cards — and get a lot of business cards. You’ll be meeting a lot of really nice people — many of whom might want to do business with you very soon. Take notes if you have to, to remember names and businesses.

NEXT UP: 5 more things to know about a Vegas trade show

LATER: How do I Instagram that??? Challenges of B2B social

RELATED: DWM takes you inside #IBSVegas

 

Editor’s note: This series is part of an experimental guest lecture on marketing and B2B social media for Northern Virginia Community College, where I am an adviser to the Marketing Department. These posts are written in line with my advisory role, not in my role as audience engagement editor for USA TODAY. Travel, expenses and the consequences of foolish decisions were paid in full by me.