Posts Tagged ‘politics’

The White House posted a blog post Monday announcing their newest social-media effort on the location-based network, foursquare.

The administration’s newest membership coincides with President Obama’s three-day trip through the Midwest to address economic concerns. Last spotted: Seed Savers Exchange on North Winn Road in Decorah, Iowa.

Twitter: My other home on the 'NetThe SFGate looks at Obama’s town hall meeting held Wednesday on Twitter. The article says Obama’s latest effort to tap into social and mobile media drew 169,395 tweeted questions on taxes, the budget and education, and gave the president a new in with the public.

From the story:

“Fireside chats were to Roosevelt what social media is to Obama,” said Andrew Rasiej, founder of the Personal Democracy Forum, a website on politics and technology.

Meanwhile, FactCheck.org takes a closer look at some of what it calls Obama’s “mis-tweets.”

From the post:

Obama also boasted that the payroll tax cut passed in December “put an extra $1,000 in the pockets of almost every single American.” The president is giving an average for all taxpayers, not a figure for “almost every single American.” The value of the tax cut depends on how much money each American makes. And the working poor ended up paying more as a result of the deal that included the payroll tax cut.

P050111PS-0210 by The White House
P050111PS-0210, a photo by The White House on Flickr.

Ever the social media masters, the Obama administration uses flickr to publicize a series of pictures from inside the White House, depicting the hours leading up to the president’s announcement that al-Qaeda leader Osama bin Laden had been killed by U.S. special forces in Abbottabad, Pakistan.

Twitter: My other home on the 'NetJust when I start to doubt social media’s muscle — (which happens when I garden)  — something such as Sunday’s late-night announcement of terror mastermind Osama bin Laden’s death makes me believe again.

I was at work when the speculation started about Obama’s announcement, throwing in my ridiculous two cents, and watched as the news of Osama’s death evolved from 140-character rumors and bronzed soundbites into full-blown confirmed reports — all long before Obama took the lectern.

Today, my Facebook feed, which is usually rife with Sunday night blues, dinner plans and high school reunion pics, is a welcome illustration of democracy: The mostly joyous status updates alternate between pointed-but-restrained praise for Bush’s post-9/11 efforts and nearly arrogant predictions of Obama’s 2012 victory. One or two friends have noted, rightly, that even after Osama’s demise, the United States will still have more enemies, and more than a few are quoting Mark Twain: “I’ve never wished a man dead, but I have read some obituaries with great pleasure.” A quick check of that quote shows me that it’s also all over Twitter today. Oh, maddening crowd.

Also on Twitter, there’s more celebrating and, of course, the news of the day: the quick-and-dirty posts that show who’s getting the facts fastest. I’ll have plenty of news to read when I go into work tonight, so until then I’ll enjoy a lighter perspective.

ED’S NOTE: This post reflects my interest in advertising as a marketing student. It does not endorse any product, services, organizations, campaigns or agency. The opinions expressed here are mine and in no way reflect the opinions of my employers.

The Demi and Ashton Foundation’s new “Real Men” interactive campaign begins this week, using A-listers such as Justin Timberlake to educate the public about the child sex trade in the USA.

Certainly it’s a cause more worthy than, say, aiding a Kardashian or a Real Housewife — the foundation’s efforts to raise awareness aren’t without merit. But doesn’t there seem to be a huge disconnect here between the very serious subject of child sex slavery and the flippant tone of the ad’s script?

USA TODAY’s Jackie Kucinich looks at how 140 characters can hurt a political campaign in the digital age. A status update gone wrong can go viral — and fast — and the next thing you know, Politico is reporting your indiscretion and resignation.

From the story with the snazzy headline that I wrote:

The rise of social media such as Twitter, Facebook and YouTube have accelerated the rate an off-color remark or e-mail can be posted on a news site and in seconds turn into a national story read by millions of people.

Bill Burton, Democratic strategist and former spokesman for President Obama, puts the new dynamic in stark terms: “There is a lightning quickness to the speed at which candidates can build and accidentally dismantle their own campaigns. If candidates don’t figure out their place in the new digital world of politics, they will be destroyed by it.”

Does that headline seem familiar? It might. It’s the headline I wrote for today’s story in USA TODAY. (I did not, however, edit the online story.) Didn’t read it? That’s OK. I’ll recap and link: Men’s Health, with the help of Rodale Inc., is reporting that Washington, D.C., is the top socially networked city in the country!

The exclamation point there is just a result of an extra cup of coffee on a rainy day — not actual surprise. It makes sense that the one U.S. city where reach and influence is everything that every person would be wired in Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn and beyond. (“My 140 crappy characters will change this world! I know it!” ~Insert name of unknown congressman here.)

El Paso appears to be the least wired-in city, with research suggesting that residents have a high rate of job satisfaction. The USA TODAY story quotes psychologist and MIT professor Sherry Turkle who says El Paso residents could simply be happier with their off-line lives.

From the story:

“When people are gratified and fulfilled in their face-to-face interactions, when these satisfy their desire for connection, for gossip, for feeling wanted and plugged in, they don’t need to feel technologically plugged in,” Turkle says.

It’s a shame this story couldn’t have been longer because Turkle touches on a question I wrestle with daily: Would I be so plugged in if I were happier and more connected in the physical world? I think that’s something everyone should ask themselves from time to time, especially as digital networks continue to expand and permeate our lives.

Would we be happier without Facebook? Twitter? Digg? Reddit? Etc.?