Archive for the ‘trends’ Category

Nielsen reports that Google is still the top web brand in 2011, followed by Facebook, which is where Americans spend the most time online. According to Nielsen’s Q3 social media report,  Facebook users spent 53.5 billion minutes on the site in May 2011. (I bet I work with some of those Facebook enthusiasts.) It is also the top social networking site through mobile devices: 46,500,000 unique audience members.

New data released by comScore (NASDAQ: SCOR) suggests iPads aren’t just for die-hard Apple loyalists, the boys — and girls — who wait with bated breath each year to see what Steve Jobs has up his turtleneck.

Nope, iPad owners also use other devices and platforms. Although the comScore Mobilens report shows Apple is — not surprisingly — the most popular smartphone OEM (original equipment manufacturer) among iPad users, Research in Motion (RIM) is second with a 17.5% share, followed by Samsung with 14.3%. Google’s Android is not absent from the findings, either: The report examines the Apple iOS-Android rivalry and finds that 14.2% of iPad users have Android phones, indicating the savviest consumers know you can’t commit to just one OS forever.

Further disposing of the fanboy myth are the age profiles of iPad users: The 25-34 group makes up 27% of iPad users, followed by the 35-44 folks at 20%. So while the 25-44 segment are most likely seeking more advanced technical capabilities, they’re also more likely to have the discretionary income to buy an iPad — more so than, say, the 18-24 crowd (15.2%) and the 55-64 group (7.3%).

27% of iPad users are 25 to 34 years old.

comScore Mobilens
February 2011 study

The 18-24 set won’t be without for long, though. The growth of the e-textbook market will see to that, putting tablets –including iPads — and other mobile learning tools in the hands of younger users and marking the declining cost of adoption.

In the latest proof of the shift in the textbook industry: CourseSmart, a consortium of e-textbook providers, has partnered with Pearson eCollege (NYSE: PSO) to offer colleges and universities access to more than 20,000 textbook titles and other course materials from more than 25 publishers. (By contrast, Publishers’ Weekly reported in August that CourseSmart’s iPad app offered access to 14,000 digital textbooks from five publishers. ) The new titles will be made available through Pearson’s LearningStudio, a cloud-based software-as-a-service platform that allows colleges to offer students the option to buy digital education materials at a lower cost.

UPDATE 04-20-2011: CourseSmart announced today its app for Android, CourseSmart for Android 1.0. (Awesome name. Hope they paid that marketer well.)

From the news release, CourseSmart for Android 1.0 at a glance:

  • Search for a topic within a single book or across an entire e-textbook stack and access the table of contents
  • Zoom in on text and graphs
  • Scroll through or jump to individual pages
  • Read e-textbooks in landscape or portrait mode
  • View, add and edit text notes
  • Access to 90% of all core higher education textbooks in use today
  • Shop for books at up to 60% off using an AOS version of CourseSmart’s website

eMarketer graphic on tablet users' habits

UPDATE 04-20-2011: eMarketer looks
 at an AdMob study that shows 80% of tablets are used at home and they’re used for entertainment purposes. The No. 1 activity: playing games. I guess even older users love Angry Birds. Only 46% of respondents say they read e-books on tablets.
Click on the eMarketer graphic to read the whole post.

Nielsen reports that Google is still the top web brand for March, followed by Facebook, which was tops in average time spent on site: 6:35:43.

I bet I work with some of those Facebook enthusiasts.

A quick look at the unique audience numbers:

Emarketer study looks at U.S. mobile ad spending. The study estimates a 48% jump from 2010. (Graphic mapped to eMarketer blog post about study.)

 

 

 

via Quick Stat: US Mobile Ad Spending Expected to Break 1 Billion This Year.

Amazon: You can't pee onlineAt right is a sign spotted days ago at a closed Borders in Chicago. There are a lot of fourth-grade-level bathroom jokes I could make, but I won’t. I will agree, though, the sign makes a good argument for the brick-and-mortar bookstores.

In other publishing news, Barnes & Noble is recruiting app developers for its Android-based NOOK Color Reader Tablet. For more information, check out the NOOK Developer blog or register as a developer.

This news comes on the heels of the late-March frenzy inspired the April update for NOOK.

The NOOK Color at a glance:

    Height: 8.1 inches
    Width: 5.0 inches
    Depth: 0.48 inches
    Weight: 15.8 ounces
    Price: $259

 
And that concludes my reporting on eBooks today because my portfolio needs polishing and I have an e-commerce project I need to wrap up.

Photo via e-reads and e-BookNewser.

Source: Barnes & Noble

I meant to post this a few days ago, but life interrupted. Better late than never.

In the interest of all things e-textbook-related, a roundup of the NOOK Color April update reports that has everyone in a tizzy.

The NOOK Color at a glance:

    Height: 8.1 inches
    Width: 5.0 inches
    Depth: 0.48 inches
    Weight: 15.8 ounces
    Price: $259

Also of interest in the wake of the Wi-Fi-only Xoom release: A February article from Tech Republic on how to hack the NOOK Color into a full Android tablet. As the story responsibly notes,
if you do this, you will void the warranty. Proceed with caution.

EARLIER: A roundup of e-textbook developments and forecasts, as well as a student’s two cents on the shift in the industry.

EVEN EARLIER: The Wall Street Journal reported the publishing powerhouses were going to expand their e-textbook offerings.

The Wall Street Journal and New York Times reported that textbook publishers McGraw-Hill and Pearson have invested in Inkling, the San Francisco-based e-textbook developer.

From The Wall Street Journal story:

Inkling declined to disclose the specific amounts McGraw-Hill and Pearson invested or the total funding it has raised so far. The start-up’s current investors– Sequoia Capital, Felicis Ventures, Kapor Capital, and Sherpalo Ventures–also took part in the financing.

EARLIER: A roundup of e-textbook developments and forecasts, and a student’s two cents on the shift in the industry.

EVEN EARLIER: The Wall Street Journal reported the publishing powerhouses were going to expand their e-textbook offerings.