From earlier: What you say when someone awesome leaves a business they love.

Today is my husband’s last day at USA TODAY, a place where he has spent the past 14 years helping shape the nation’s news — through nights, through holidays, through buyouts and layoffs. Today is also his last day in journalism, just one month shy of his 26th anniversary in the business he fell in love with.Trey Barrineau, USA TODAY

For Trey, journalism was a calling, a profession he believed in, a profession he was eager to praise. Over the past 15 years, as he watched the news industry shift, shake and stumble as it struggles to reinvent itself, he was equally quick to criticize it — and defend it. That flip-flop is part of the love affair with news, something only journalists would understand. Just as only journalists would understand how hard it is to ever consider leaving the newsroom.

Trey’s decision to make the leap into trade publications did not come easily. He loved the newsroom. He loved his co-workers. He loved the news business. “It’s all I ever wanted to do,” he said.keuroac

I understood — and still do, which is why I’m writing this to him today.

Trey, I know how much you love journalism. I also know your talents are many and your versatility is without bounds. I know that you’ll be great in whatever you do after journalism. There is life after the newsroom. A big, beautiful life. Our gifted colleagues who have been bought out or laid off have shown us that time and again. There are so many of them, too many, but they live their lives well — as you will.

But if you’re ever feeling nostalgic for the newsroom, I want you to remember two things:

1) Journalism isn’t the same profession that you fell in love with — far from it. We only have to look as far as the most recent headlines to show us that. Newsrooms around the globe devoted a week to nauseating, ’round-the-clock reporting on Kim Kardashian’s ass, a collective effort that easily proves my point multiple times over.

2) The colleagues you loved most are long gone, ousted by the industry’s cruel economics. The newsroom is not what it once was because so many of the people who mattered most to you are not here.Determine page

Perhaps I’m the wrong person to write this. I’m much too eager to cheer when a colleague or former colleague makes a break for their newsroom’s nearest exit. I do not believe journalism is God’s work. I do not believe journalism is the only noble form of communication, and I don’t believe leaving it means throwing down ethics. And for now, news’ mission of truth tellers and watchdogs lives in some forms — but for how long? Although there are thousands of true believers out there fighting its corruption, we have to wonder at what cost — especially when people we love are on the front lines in the death battle for eyeballs, and their destinies look more uncertain with every quarter’s balance sheet.clinton7

That said, the future — your future — is far from bleak.

Communications is an art. There are endless ways to tell the world’s stories — and the truth. There will always be a need for well-crafted message that inspires and informs, shapes and reforms, deciphers and expounds. You’ve spent a rich career clarifying the muddiest of deadline-battered copy and writing pure poetry in headlines — all the while racing a merciless clock. Now it’s time to take those immense talents and use them well outside a newsroom. And as you go, I have zero doubt that you’ll craft many meaningful messages and tell many beautiful stories, no matter where you are.

Godspeed, my love.

USA TODAY’s Your Take recently featured an unusual composite of the October “blood moon.” Community manager Jessica Cervantes takes a look at how contributor Mike Mezeul II did it.

Your Take: How did they do that?

Image  —  Posted: November 4, 2014 in Miscellaneous

USA TODAY has more from Your Take contributor Becky Peterson‘s insider’s look at the pro-democracy protests in Hong Kong. By Jessica Cervantes.

Take 5 on USA TODAY: A round up of the best reader photos.

Take 5 on USA TODAY: A round up of the best reader photos.

Your Take top contributor Becky Peterson has an inside look at the protests in Hong Kong. See it at USA TODAY.

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Today’s groovy Google doodle salutes novelist Leo Tolstoy.

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Image  —  Posted: September 9, 2014 in Google
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Jacqui Barrineau:

I’ve had the pleasure of this woman making drinks in my home. Follow this recipe if you want to be delighted.

Originally posted on Living A la Mode:

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Have you ever heard of agua fresca? It is a very fancy way of saying sweet juice. Or technically fresh water, but the catch is, it is never just water. I mean, if it was just water it would be called water and that would be boring. And if you are not in the mood for something with alcohol you can sound extra fancy saying “do you have any agua fresca?” as opposed to, “do you have any fruit juice?”

One of my favorite agua fresca’s happens to include one of my favorite summer obsessions, watermelon. And it is so easy and you can really do it with any fruit. I plan on expanding my agua fresca horizons later on this summer. But for now, it is watermelon for me.

Just take some watermelon and put it through a blender or food processor and liquefy. Then strain…

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